Celebrate National Child Health Day!

Join Reach Out and Read Wisconsin on Monday, Oct. 1

Reach Out and Read Wisconsin staff with message bubble signs

In 1928, Congress created Child Health Day, a national observance bringing attention to the “fundamental necessity” of children’s health programs.

In the spirit of the first National Child Health Day, Children’s Health Alliance of Wisconsin is hosting a social media campaign to raise awareness for children’s health. You can show your support for kids by taking a photo and posting on Facebook or Twitter using the hashtag #ForKidsHealth. The individual or organization with the most creative photo will win a $25 gift card! See contest rules at www.chawisconsin.org.

To receive a free #ForKidsHealth message bubble sign, please complete the online request form by Sept. 14. If you would like additional signs for your clinic or partners, please contact ljensen@chw.org.

Thank you for your support and partnership as we work to improve children’s health and literacy in Wisconsin. Please follow Children’s Health Alliance of Wisconsin on Facebook and Twitter.

We look forward to seeing your photos on Oct. 1!

For Kids Health message bubble

Children’s Health Alliance of Wisconsin

It may seem like Reach Out and Read (ROR) Wisconsin operates on its own, but we are actually part of a larger policy and advocacy group called the Children’s Health Alliance of Wisconsin (Alliance). The Alliance provides a home for ROR Wisconsin by providing financial, administrative and graphic design support. The Alliance’s goals are to raise awareness for children’s health, mobilize leaders, impact public health and implement programs proven to work. To accomplish this, the Alliance oversees seven initiatives:

  • Asthma
  • Early Literacy (ROR Wisconsin)
  • Emergency Care
  • Grief and Bereavement
  • Injury Prevention and Death Review
  • Medical Home
  • Oral Health

These initiatives work together to spread awareness, foster collaboration between key partners, influence legislation and implement effective programs and coalitions that lead to better outcomes for kids across the state. Here are some notable accomplishments from the past year:

Asthma: The Wisconsin Asthma Coalition (WAC) conducts walkthroughs to identify asthma triggers and provide low to no-cost recommendations to reduce or eliminate triggers. This year, Asthma staff completed walkthroughs in 14 schools and 15 child care centers in five different counties. Additionally, staff worked with YoungStar, Wisconsin’s child care quality rating program, to better align their environmental standards with WAC’s guidelines. These efforts, and many others, will continue into the 2018-19 school year.

Wisconsin Asthma Coalition logo

Emergency Medical Services for Children: The Emergency Medical Services for Children Program (EMSC) has partnered with 14 emergency departments to improve their pediatric readiness. Over the next two years, the emergency departments will use a quality improvement frame work to improve pediatric emergency care safety and quality. The following emergency departments are participating:

    • Crossing Rivers Health – Crawford County
    • Memorial Medical Center – Ashland
    • Sauk Prairie Healthcare – Prairie du Sac
    • Southwest Health Center – Platteville
    • Mile Bluff Medical Center – Mauston
    • Divine Savior Healthcare – Portage
    • UnityPoint Health – Meriter – Madison
    • Howard Young Medical Center – Woodruff
    • Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare – Franklin Hospital
    • Waupun Memorial Hospital
    • Mercyhealth Hospital and Medical Center – Walworth
    • Mercyhealth System and Trauma Center – Janesville
    • Aurora Sheboygan Memorial Medical Center
    • Marshfield Medical Center
  • EMSC also provided two pediatric specific education sessions for pre-hospital providers in Door and Oneida counties. A total of 46 emergency care providers were trained at the March 24 and May 10 sessions.

Emergency Medical Services for Children logo

 

Infant Death Center: The Infant Death Center (IDC) gave two presentations on addressing the unique bereavement needs of mothers experiencing pregnancy and infant loss. The first presentation was at the southeastern Wisconsin Prenatal Care Coordination Partnership (PNCC), a diverse group of agencies and medical providers who offer the PNCC Medicaid benefit to women in the southeastern portion of Wisconsin. The IDC also presented to a group of home visiting nurses at the Southside Health Center in Milwaukee.

Wisconsin Infant Death Center logo

 

Injury Prevention and Death Review: In partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Justice and the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, the Injury Prevention and Death Review staff facilitated the Keeping Kids Alive in Wisconsin Conference on April 17-18 at the Best Western Premier Waterfront Hotel & Convention Center in Oshkosh. More than 100 local child death review (CDR) and fetal infant mortality review (FIMR) team members attended to explore trends in child death and learn about best practice prevention strategies. The Clark County CDR team was awarded the annual William Perloff Keeping Kids Alive in Wisconsin Award for successfully implementing prevention activities in their community through data collection and death reviews.  

Keeping Kids Alive Logo

Medical Home: Medical homes are characterized by trusting partnerships between families, children and their health care teams. Children who receive care within a medical home may have improved health outcomes and families are more satisfied with such care. The Medical Home initiative works to ensure more Wisconsin children are served within medical homes by guiding, educating, and partnering with health care teams and families. Over the last year, Medical Home staff have completed 18 trainings in 11 counties, reaching 154 attendees, including 51 clinicians. The trainings discussed developmental screening within child well-care, pediatric mental health screening and other key resources.

Medical Home logo

Oral Health: On June 21, 2017, Governor Scott Walker signed Assembly Bill 146. This new law allows dental hygienists to practice with fewer restrictions and in more settings including nursing homes, hospitals, day care centers and physicians’ offices. The Oral Health team actively supported the bill in order to expand access to oral services statewide.

Wisconsin Oral Health logo

Reach Out and Read Wisconsin: Over the past year, 20 clinics launched new ROR programs. There are now more than 215 ROR programs in Wisconsin! This growth will continue into 2019 as two health systems, SSM Health Dean Medical Group and ThedaCare Physicians, are planning to make ROR a standard of pediatric care by providing ROR in all of their Wisconsin clinics. They join 10 health systems already implementing ROR within all of their Wisconsin clinics; Access Community Health Centers, Group Health Cooperative of South Central Wisconsin, Milwaukee Health Services, NorthLakes Community Clinic, Progressive Community Health Centers, Vernon Memorial Healthcare, UW Health, Watertown Regional Medical Center and Wildwood Family Clinic.

Reach Out and Read Wisconsin logo

The Alliance’s graphic design and communication team supports all of the initiatives’ work with newsletters, conference materials, social media campaigns, promotional items and annual reports. They also manage the Alliance website, which will be getting a major update in the coming months.  

If you would like to support the Alliance’s work to improve children’s health, please visit our website or consider making a donation.

Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin staff at Miller Park
                               The Alliance staff at our annual retreat at Miller Park!

August and September Literacy events

Continue the summer fun and get the kids ready for back to school with these literacy events taking place across Wisconsin. If you don’t see an event in your area, be sure to check out your local library’s website or other local community resources.

August 2018

Date County Name Location Time More information
Aug 1 Fond du Lac Toddler story times Fond du Lac Public Library 32 Sheboygan St. 9:30 a.m. bit.ly/2uRx6Zl
Aug 2 Milwaukee Preschool story time Milwaukee Public Library 814 W Wisconsin St. Milwaukee, WI 10:00 a.m. bit.ly/2uTzT4f
Aug 7 Green Bay Children’s story time at Green Bay Botanical Garden Botanical Garden 2600 Larsen Rd Green Bay, WI 10:00 am bit.ly/2LFwwra This is an ongoing event. Check website for more dates.
Aug 10 Dane Robert Kurson, Rocket Men 702WI 702 E Johnson St. Madison, WI 7:00 pm bit.ly/2LRZdxU
Aug 10 Brown Prevea Read and Play Bay Park Square Mall 303 Bay Sq. Green Bay, WI 9:30 am bit.ly/2sa8dFP
Aug 17 Dane Summer in YOUR City: Kids create at the top of State The Grove, Intersection of W Mifflin and State St. Madison, WI 10:00 am – 1:00 pm bit.ly/2NNw7jJ
Aug 18 Dane Julie Fine, What Should Be Wild 702WI 702 E Johnson St. Madison, WI 11:00 am

 

bit.ly/2mJEzVF

Aug 22 La Crosse Family story time La Crosse Public Library 800 Main St. La Crosse, WI 10:30 am – 11:15 am

bit.ly/2mLWWcE

This is an ongoing event. Check the website for more dates

September 2018

Date County Name Location Time More information
Sept 7 – 8 La Crosse La Crosse Storytelling Festival Myrick Park 2000 La Crosse St. La Crosse, WI 6:30 pm bit.ly/2LVTFma
Sept 8 Everywhere International Literacy Day Worldwide – check the library or Google for local events All day bit.ly/2mMC30U
Sept 14 Brown Prevea Read and Play Bay Park Square Mall 303 Bay Park Sq.Green Bay, WI 9:30 a.m. bit.ly/2sa8dFP
Sept 25 Kenosha Family Literacy Night Kenosha Literacy Council 2419 63rd St Kenosha, WI 5:30 pm – 10 pm bit.ly/2uQT6n0
Sept 28 Dane Read Like Mad (Community reading event) Madison, WI   bit.ly/2uS7nQx

Do you know of an upcoming children’s literacy event in your area? Get it featured on this list by emailing Alex Rogers arogers@chw.org with details!

Outdoor portrait of young girl reading under tree
Get outside this summer and read

An Epic donation

Reach Out and Read (ROR) Wisconsin recently received more than 1,200 books thanks to Epic’s annual book drive in Madison. Our staff will distribute these new and gently-used books across Wisconsin as we travel to clinics for site visits. This is Epic’s fourth annual book drive to benefit ROR Wisconsin.

The new books will be prescribed and given to children by their medical provider at well-child visits from 6 months to 5 years. The gently-used books will help clinics expand their literacy-rich environment as they can be kept in waiting areas or exam rooms for families to enjoy while they are waiting to see the provider. Gently-used books can also be used to supplement the new books and they make great gifts for older siblings who visit the clinic with a ROR-aged brother or sister.

If you are interested in hosting a book drive for a ROR Wisconsin clinic near you, please contact Alex Rogers at arogers@chw.org or (608) 442-4175. Clinics accept books for kids of all ages, but we do ask that you screen donated books before dropping them off at a clinic. Please use our book guidelines when screening and sorting donations.

We would like to thank book drive coordinators Kate Parr and Adrienne Kiser and all the generous Epic employees who donated books. ROR Wisconsin is very grateful for our continued partnership with Epic and we know our clinics and families appreciate these books.

Two Epic employees with their donation of books to Reach Out and Read Wisconsin
Thank you Epic employees for your generous donation to ROR Wisconsin!

Baseball, books and brains

Several families joined Reach Out and Read Wisconsin staff at the Duck Pond on Sunday, June 10 for our annual Madison Mallards fundraiser. The Mallards are a Madison-based collegiate summer baseball team that competes in the Northwoods League. It was a thrilling game, as the Mallards won with a home run in the bottom of the 10th inning. Tickets sales raised $170 dollars for our statewide literacy program. This money will provide more than 50 books. Children will bring home these books from their doctor’s office to enjoy again and again.

Books build better brains. Children participating in Reach Out and Read have language development scores that are improved by 3-6 months. Last year, more than 109,000 children statewide left their well-child visits with the gift of a new, high-quality book. But there’s more to Reach Out and Read Wisconsin than just those books.

Behind the baseball and the books, our program:

  • Is a two-generational clinical intervention that supports parent-child bonding, early brain development and a life-long love of learning
  • Has almost unparalleled access to children through medical clinics (nearly 90% of all young children see a healthcare provider at least annually for a check-up), supporting families through the trusted voice of their medical provider
  • Is incredibly cost-effective, as the implementation is embedded in the existing health systems
  • Is growing quickly, at the rate of 30 clinics a year (more than 20 clinics have initiated applications since the beginning of 2018!)

If you were unable to attend the Mallards game but would like to support our work, please use the button below! Thank you for giving more Wisconsin children the opportunity to reach out and read.

change a life by donating to reach out and read wisconsin

 

people in bleachers at madison mallards fundraiser
Friends and supporters of Reach Out and Read Wisconsin at the Madison Mallards game

My AmeriCorps HealthCorps experience

Since September 11, 2017, I have been serving a full AmeriCorps term with the Children’s Health Alliance of Wisconsin. This is my first experience fully submerging myself into public health. Although I have only been here a short time, I have gained valuable insight on how to S.U.C.C.E.E.D. in the public health field.

 Support

My term with AmeriCorps has been a transition. There’s been a considerable learning curve as I’ve taken all the skills I learned in the classroom and put them to use. The shift to full independent living and the stress of graduate school applications has made it challenging at times. This has taught me the true importance of support. I am not just talking about the support you give and receive from interpersonal relationships, but also the support you give yourself. I realized that our professional and personal lives will inevitably intertwine and the effects can be depleting. When you aren’t supporting yourself in one area, you will always feel it in another. It is important to be able to recognize how you’re feeling physically and emotionally, and create a game plan to either sustain the positive environment or change the circumstances. A phrase I have truly started to embody is: “self-care is healthcare.”

Unconventional

Here at Children’s Health Alliance of Wisconsin, we have seven initiatives. That means there is always a lot going on! We not only support existing statewide programs, but we also work to create new perspectives on children’s health issues. We know public health works to create systems change. In order to create that change, we need individuals who think inside, outside and all around the box. Don’t be afraid to take the leap and explore ideas that may seem too unconventional. Sometimes radical ideas ignite our success.

 Coalition Creation

The Alliance serves as a table where federal, state and local stakeholders can gather and discuss the health issues children are facing in Wisconsin. If I have learned anything from my time in this position, it is that public health success relies on strong relationships. Coalition creation is the key to getting things done. Coalitions need interdisciplinary professionals to meet the needs of every problem. Once established, coalitions require integrity and accountability to sustain over time.

 Exceed Expectations

My last two points go hand in hand. The first is to exceed expectations. Going beyond what is expected will never go unnoticed and it’s appreciated by all those involved. When you produce good work, you feel prepared and confident, which creates a positive work environment. Always ask how you can do better and if you can do more.

Detail

The final thing I’ve learned is the importance of detail. Detail is everything! When planning an event, it is so important to have every detail checked multiple times. When attention to detail is a priority, events run smoothly. This has become evident while working with our Reach Out and Read Wisconsin team. One of my responsibilities is to coordinate state legislators’ visits to our Reach Out and Read clinics. Paying attention to details during planning has made state leaders more informed and helped them make decisions that positively impact children.

One of my favorite parts about being an AmeriCorps member at the Alliance has been working with our state’s amazing Reach Out and Read team! They are an inspiration to me and I am always amazed at the work they accomplish with such a small but mighty staff. If it was not for their positive support and guidance, I would not have been able to put together four successful legislative visits. Some of the best moments have been watching our state leaders engage with books and children. The smiles on everyone’s faces are a reminder of why Reach Out and Read is such an impactful program.

June and July literacy events

Summer is here and what better way to start off this season of sun, fun and hopefully some relaxing time spent reading than by attending a literacy event in your area? Check out the information below for local Wisconsin events happening in June and July. If you don’t see an event in your area, be sure to check out your local library’s website as they often have many summer reading programs for both kids and adults.

Please note: use arrows below table to scroll to the right for more information.

June 2018

DateCountyCategoryNameLocationTimeMore information
June 1KenoshaCommunity eventSummer Reading Kick Off FestivalSouthwest Library 7979 38th Ave Kenosha, WI5:00 - 8:00 p.m.https://bit.ly/2sfW82L

June 6St. CroixCommunity eventWestern Wisconsin Health Community Open House CelebrationWestern Wisconsin Health 1100 Bergslien St Baldwin, WI 540024:00 - 7:00 p.m.www.wwhealth.org
June 7DaneAuthor eventShawn Francis Peters, The Infamous Harry HaywardVerona Public Library 500 Silent St Verona, WI7:00 p.m.bit.ly/2s3dqAe
June 8BrownChildren's reading eventPrevea Read and PlayBay Park Square Mall 303 Bay Sq. Green Bay, WI 9:30 a.m.bit.ly/2sa8dFP
June 8DaneAuthor eventDevin Murphy, The Boat Runner702WI 702 E Johnson St Madison, WI 7:00 p.m.bit.ly/2GK0MdT

Registration needed
June 9DaneBook saleLiteracy Network Used Book SaleLiteracy Network 701 Dane St Madison, WI 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.bit.ly/2KOmDmK
June 10DaneFundraising eventMadison Mallards Game to support ROR WisconsinThe Duck Pond 2920 N. Sherman Ave Madison, WI4:10 p.m.http://madison-mallards.northwoodsleague.tv/Buy/Tickets

Type READ into promo box
June 13DaneAuthor eventDavid McGlynn, One Day You'll Thank Me702WI 702 E Johnson St Madison, WI 7:00 p.m.bit.ly/2kh7VcG
Registration needed
DateCountyCategoryNameLocationTimeMore information
July 7La CrosseChildren's reading eventFarmers' Market Story TimeCameron Park 4th St S and King St La Crosse, WI12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.https://bit.ly/2IUJxbE
July 13BrownChildren's reading eventPrevea Read and PlayBay Park Square Mall 303 Bay Park Sq Green Bay, WI9:30 a.m.bit.ly/2sa8dFP
July 28DaneAuthor eventEmily Fridlund, Catapult702WI 702 E Johnson St Madison, WI11:00 a.m.bit.ly/2s3dqAe
Registration needed

Library summer reading programs for kids:

Fox Valley programs

Madison Public Library

Milwaukee Public Library

Monroe Public Library

Know of an upcoming literacy event in your area that you would like to see included on this list? Email Alex Rogers arogers@chw.org with details!

Outdoor portrait of young girl reading under tree, events

Reading programs are really about supporting strong parent-child bonds

This article was originally published by the Cap Times on April 23, 2018.

Toddler at well-child visits at doctor's office receiving a book from her provider. Reading programs often are supporting of parents and children.
PHOTO BY COBURN DUKEHART — WISCONSIN CENTER FOR INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM

Recently, I encountered a new-to-Wisconsin mother and toddler who had left behind a not-so-good environment. As we established trust with one another, it came out that she was concerned about her child’s mild speech delay. The upheaval in their lives meant they hadn’t been able to find a primary care clinic and schedule his regular checkups yet. What could I do that might offer some immediate benefit for them?

As many know, I do a lot of work around early literacy promotion. In the last few weeks, there have been two relevant, notable studies released in this field. The first article is a meta-analysis — a combining of several studies together — showing interventions in parent-child shared reading have clear benefits, not just to the child’s language and literacy skills (we’ve known this for some time), but also psychosocially. There were better social and emotional skills and improved behavior in the children. Less expected was the benefit to parents, who had less stress, less anxiety, and greater confidence in their ability to parent.

The second study was on the Video Interaction Project (created by an NYU friend and colleague, Dr. Alan Mendelsohn). It uses video recording of a parent playing and reading with their child, followed by watching the recording together with a parenting coach who points out notable moments in the interaction. The researchers found decreases in child aggression, hyperactivity, and difficulty with attention.

These both support the value of working on early literacy skills, the foundation of the almost-30-year-old Reach Out and Read program, which makes discussion about early literacy an integral and routine part of checkups in early childhood. (Note: I am the founding medical director of Reach Out and Read Wisconsin, and serve on the national board.)

However, I’d like to point out that these studies emphasize a critical element that’s not always present in the countless literacy programs out there. While you may view Reach Out and Read as a child literacy program, it’s really secretly a parenting program: a program designed to gently and collaboratively support strong shared reading between a parent and a child.

I don’t object to programs that bring high-quality books into a child’s home, but that emphasis is often misplaced; the book itself does little if handed to a child without any other interaction. A child learns the magic and power of reading only when a loving, nurturing, responsive caregiver (usually a parent, but could be anyone) reads aloud with them. A book that sits on the shelf is useless — it only does its magic when open in the hands of a parent and child reading together.

Equally important is a parent who knows how to read effectively to a young, squirmy toddler, a technique known as dialogic reading. Simply reading at a child doesn’t work for a child with a naturally short attention span. Knowing how to read with them and interact is an important learned skill. Merely providing books accomplishes only part of the job — supporting parenting confidence is absolutely essential.

It’s not just about the books. It’s about the act of reading together. A book without a caring adult…is just a book.

The key point: Parents benefit most when we offer clear modeling, coaching and encouragement. It’s not enough to say what to do; careful intentional skill-building is crucial for success. This explains the incredible outcomes seen from high-quality home visiting programs, for example. So question projects and recognize that they are not all the same. Ask yourself if they merely provide resources or whether they are building capabilities or capacities in families

So what of the family I encountered? I took the board book we had given him and pointed out her child’s brief interactions with the book. Then I modeled talking about illustrations and I reassured her that his turning away quickly was just his normal short attention span. Finally, I complimented her on her good parenting when she described how he would bring a book to her and “ask” to be read to.

She beamed with pride. And that’s how I knew we were doing right by her.

Dipesh Navsaria, MPH, MSLIS, MD is the medical director of Reach Out and Read Wisconsin
Dipesh Navsaria, MPH, MSLIS, MD is the medical director of Reach Out and Read Wisconsin

Librarian visits Reach Out and Read clinic to talk about early literacy

Madison Public Library Youth Services Librarian Holly Storck-Post (middle) with UW Health 20 South Park Street Staff and reading volunteer
Madison Public Library Youth Services Librarian Holly Storck-Post (middle) with UW Health 20 South Park Street Staff and reading volunteer

Holly Storck-Post, a Youth Services librarian from Madison Public Library recently visited clinicians and staff at UW Health’s 20 South Park Street location. Holly shared information with clinic staff about library programming and ways librarians engage families around early literacy.

Madison Public Library gives families information that is very similar to what Reach Out and Read (ROR) providers give at well-child visits. The librarians share ways to build early literacy skills by telling parents to talk, sing, read, write and play with their kids. They provide encouragement to parents and offer practical advice. Through their free high-quality programming, librarians model reading aloud for parents and show how to engage children of all ages with books.

Hearing this messaging in two different environments is important for parents. Not only are parents hearing from their child’s medical providers that early literacy is crucial to brain development, but they also learn this during activities at the library. When two organizations in different sectors are promoting early literacy, it makes sense to develop a collaboration.

Benefits of library collaboration

ROR Wisconsin encourages clinics to collaborate with their local libraries. These partnerships have benefits for both the clinic and the library. Clinics can benefit from library staff by:

  • Helping to create literacy-rich environments throughout the clinic
  • Coordinating reading times in the waiting room with volunteer readers
  • Collecting gently-used book donations for the clinic
  • Acting as partners on grant applications
  • Suggesting new book titles or helping with book selection

However, clinics are not the only ones who benefit from this collaboration. Libraries benefit from partnering with medical providers who:

  • Encouraging families to visit the library and getting a free library card
  • Sharing information about free library events and programming suitable for all ages
  • Assisting libraries in their outreach efforts to families who have not been library users in the past

UW Health’s 20 South Park Street Clinic does a great job collaborating with and promoting their local library. Information about library hours, events and programming is posted in the waiting room. Stacks of free Kidspages (a seasonal publication from the library highlighting children’s programming and reading tips) are available for families to take home.

This clinic has also created a wonderful literacy-rich environment with posters, gently-used books and a children’s reading area. Twice per week, the clinic has volunteers who read aloud to kids (and model ways to engage squirmy toddlers) while they wait for their doctor’s appointment.

Children’s reading area in the waiting room encourages kids to read
Children’s reading area in the waiting room encourages kids to read

While UW Health 20 South Park Street is a pediatric clinic they also recognize the importance of adult literacy. Information is posted about local resources for adults who may be struggling with their own literacy challenges. Magazines for adult readers are available for waiting parents. Seeing a parent read signals to the child that reading is important and can increase the child’s desire to read too.

For more information about finding a public library in your area visit the Wisconsin Public Library System Directory. To find more information about adult literacy resources across the state, visit Wisconsin Literacy’s website.

Holly Storck-Post speaking to UW Health staff about early literacy over their lunch hour
Holly Storck-Post speaking to UW Health staff about early literacy over their lunch hour
Madison Public Library materials, including book lists, event information and tips to talk, sing, read, write and play with your child.
Madison Public Library materials, including book lists, event information and tips to talk, sing, read, write and play with your child.

Unique way to support Reach Out and Read Wisconsin this week

Reach Out and Read Wisconsin (ROR) is excited to have been chosen by Wisconsin Public Radio (WPR) as their spring membership drive’s thank you gift. When you make a monthly pledge of $10 or more to WPR, you are eligible to select the ROR thank you gift, which provides three new, high quality and developmentally appropriate books for young children throughout Wisconsin. The drive runs from Tuesday through Saturday this week.

4 reasons why you should donate this week:

  • ROR Wisconsin programs work with kids ages 6 months to 5 years. Providing books during this time delivers the most impact because it’s when their brains are growing most rapidly! 95% of the brain is developed by age 6.
  • Support medical providers as they build parents’ skills by talking about practical ways to read aloud with their kids and early literacy’s impact on future development.
  • ROR Wisconsin’s impact is statewide so the books you buy will help communities throughout Wisconsin.
  • WPR typically spends 10% of your donation on thank you gifts. By selecting the ROR thank you gift, WPR is only spending 6.7% of your donation. This means more of your money stays with WPR to help support high quality radio programming.

Donate to WPR and give books to kids through Reach Out and Read. Your gift makes a difference

Interested in making a pledge? Click here. Thank you.

To learn more about ROR Wisconsin and the impact of our work, please visit our website.